Health & Human Services

Health & Human Services Task Team

Objectives/Initiatives
6. Fit Together
Support Fit Together: the Northwest CT Healthy Eating & Active Living Initiative to improve the health of the region's workforce and reduce employer health care costs.
This Initiative Supports Goal 4 - Education and Workforce

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Minutes - Steering/BOD
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
@ NW CT Chamber of Commerce

Attendance: Jocelyn Ayer, Bill Burgess, Frank Chiaramonte, Fran Delaney, Brad Hoar, Brian Mattiello, Rich Meinert, Ted Murphy, Doug Parker, JoAnn Ryan, Sharon Waagner, Amy Wynn, Steve Zarrella, John Kania, Lori Hart, Christine Bianchi, Kris Durante, Jan Lyon, Donna Labbe, Cindy Guerreri, Elinor Carbone, Erin Wilson, Stephanie Barksdale, Paul Rougeot, Guy Rovezzi, Robert Rubbo, Greg Brisco, Leslie Polito, Dan Sherr, Carla Angevine, Maria Skinner, Kay Carroll

I. Presentation on Collective Impact
Bill Burgess introduced the guests:

John Kania, FSG managing director
"FSG is a nonprofit consulting firm specializing in strategy, evaluation, and research. We were founded in 2000 as Foundation Strategy Group and have completed more than 600 consulting engagements with many of the world's leading corporations, nonprofit organizations, and charitable foundations."

Lori Hart, Executive Director & Christine Bianchi, Chairman - Waterbury's Bridge to Success Program
"Waterbury Bridge to Success (BTS) is a partnership of local organizations, families and volunteers.  By joining forces, we ensure the city's youth, from cradle to career, have access to the quality healthcare, education and support they need to become responsible adults.  Together, we are building a strong bridge to connect our youth to a brighter future."

Dan Sherr, Executive Director of Valassis College for Advance Media Planning
Extensive experience in data analytics, providing advice and counsel to Waterbury's Bridge to Success community-based youth initiative

Why is using a collective impact process important? (John)
- Allows organizations to work more effectively together
- Frames opportunities using innovation
- Promotes positive behavioral change
- Better use of limited resources
- Cross sector alignment encourages coordinated action and sharing of lessons learned
- Emphasizes urgency, enthusiasm and realism
- Collective Impact Barriers:
- Lack of initiative
- Super counter cultural
- Tend toward isolated impact
- Alignment between organizations
- Understanding the nature of the problem:
- Is it a simple problem (baking a cake)
- A complicated problem (sending a rocket to the moon)
- Or a complex problem (raising a child - unpredictable)

What are the key components of the process? (John)
- Five elements of Collective Impact:
- Common agenda (clear goals & strategies)
- Shared measurement (track over time)
- Mutually reinforcing activities (coordination)
- Continuous communication (cross sectors)
- Backbone organization (with working groups)
- Applications: education (cradle to profession), health care (obesity), social agencies, youth development, economic development, workforce development (public housing, residents to jobs), youth substance abuse prevention
- Uses adaptive problem solving techniques vs. technical problem solving techniques
- There are no silver bullets, more like silver buckshot - impacts in multiple ways
- Must be flexible and organic - Look at sub-measures

How did your organization use the collective impact process? (Lori & Christine)
- Waterbury Bridge to Success Program is a public-private partnership bringing together 75 organizations in the Waterbury area.
- Common agenda/goal: "Waterbury youth will succeed in school, work and life"
- Shared measurements: kindergarten readiness, 3rd grade reading scores, 8th grade math scores, high school graduation rates, post-secondary graduation rates
- Mutually reinforcing activities: promote physical activities, health, early literacy, nutrition, career awareness, caregiver skills
- Continuous communication is key to success
- Actions: Created School Readiness Council, helped develop Prevention Policy guidelines for the BOE, provide community feedback, help to merge new initiatives with existing policies
- Focal points: community council, family engagement, child & health development, early care & education, positive youth development, workforce development

What process existed before? (Lori & Christine)
- Fragmentation with each organization doing their own thing

What lessons did you learn from your experiences? (Lori & Christine)
- Keep focus on data & performance measures
- Create a data inventory, review & analysis are critical
- Involve parents and community members
- Focus on community identified issues
- Small investment in backbone organization significantly influences benefits
- What makes Collective Impact different?:
- Engages all sectors
- Structured
- Flexible and organic
- Data driven
- Solutions emerge

What suggestions do you have for starting/initiating the collective impact process?
(John, Lori & Christine)
- Create a steering committee to determine purpose.
- Create a list of potential organizations for the network.
- Outline potential working groups.
- Establish community-wide messages based on healthy living, early literacy and reducing absenteeism
- Look for opportunities (gaps) that cross multiple organizations
- Submit grant requests collaboratively
- Manage data collaboratively
- Backbone Tasks:
- Guide vision
- Support aligned activities
- Established shared measures
- Data Information (Dan):
- Develop measures
- More data is better
- Data to be analyzed

How do you select the organizations/participants in the collective impact process?
(John, Lori & Christine)
- Begin with steering committee
- Be flexible, add organizations when opportunities develop
- Waterbury Partnership Funding:
- Funding for the backbone organization (foundations, city, corporations)
- Get funders at the table

Is commonality of purpose a key component of collective impact? (Group Discussion)
- Yes, driven by need for complex social changes

Can collective impact center on multiple areas simultaneously? (Group Discussion)
- Yes, but it can become more difficult to manage.

Can this be helpful to us, and if so in what way? (Group Discussion)
- Meeting attendees expressed strong interest

What would be our logical next steps? (Group Discussion)
- Doug suggested Fit Together Steering Committee discuss as the NWCTEDC Task Team most closely aligned with intended outcomes.

Who is willing to do what and by when? (Group Discussion)
- Fit Together Steering Committee will meet and discuss next steps.  

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Minutes - Board of Directors
Tuesday, January 14, 2014
@ NW CT Chamber of Commerce

Attendance: Bill Baxter, David Dean, Lou Helt, Doug Parker, Tim Abbott, Jocelyn Ayer, Bill Burgess, Frank Chiaramonte, Susan Clayton, Fiona deMerell, Celeste Echlin, Lou Helt, Brad Hoar, Leona LeJeune, Dale Martin, Dick Labich, Rich Meinert, Brian Mattiello, Patricia Mechare, John Morici, Ted Murphy, JoAnn Ryan, Stephen Silver, Dwain Snow, Don Stein, Sharon Waagner, Greg Brisco, Jan Lyon, Elinor Carbone, Bob Rubbo, Sherri Dadomo

IV. Collective Impact Presentation
Bill Burgess gave a power point presentation and hand-outs on Collective Impact: what it is, who benefits and how cities who have implemented this have benefitted.  Lengthy discussion followed and further talks will resume at 2/19 Executive Committee meeting.

Notes:
- The website for more information about Collective Impact is www.fsg.org
- Collective Impact uses a framework based on common visions for improving communities - "diverse organizations coming together to solve complex social problems"
- Collective Impact is a process for working with cascading levels of collaboration with multiple organizations sharing a common vision for community improvement.
- Collective Impact is evidence based using data and analytics to define paths forward and a creating a framework for action for continuous improvement in creating vibrant communities.
- Collective Impact is "community based problem solving."

Comments from Board members:
- Adequate staffing will be needed, anticipate 1.5 staff positions to collect and analyze data, seek and manage funding sources for implementation
- This is already happening with land trusts throughout NW CT
- UConn-Torrington could be a potential host/sponsor for this initiative
- Unites organizations with shared interests, encourages collaboration, important to stay focused
- Data focused, seeks agreement through common interests of multiple organizations
- Could increase community participation through events
- Who serves as the host organization? - NW CT Chamber, United Way NW CT, NW CT EDC, NW Hills Council of Governments?
- Requires political will, adequate staffing and funding

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July 30, 2014
Moving from "Charity" to "Investment"

Collective Impact Forum:

I found this collective Impact Forum worthwhile in thinking about developing our regional capacity for CEDS priorities, including…
Engaged & patient funders as “investors”
How to go further with balanced investment
Getting to outcomes
Leveraging relationships
Achieving synergy in public-private investment
“What’s good for one being good for all” > Pointing to the need to build foundational capacity for cross-cutting CEDS priorities
Context matters
A non-starter in the absence of NWHCOG active support

Bill Burgess

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July 28, 2014
Tech Investor Sponsors Wellness Challenge for 5 American Communities
Learning by doing…

Bill Burgess

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July 28, 2014
Wellville team meets with county officials, organization representatives

Perhaps we can learn by following progress.
“The idea behind The Way to Wellville is not just to make a measurable difference in five places, but to design and deliver a comprehensive approach to health care that can be replicated broadly”

Aspen Ideas Festival  (for context, view and listen from 6:20 to 8:40 for Esther’s “elevator chat”)




Bill Burgess

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July 26, 2014
Finding The Way To Wellville: Small Cities Compete To Get Healthier

A collective-impact initiative…Small cities (and counties) price of entry is commitment to the journey (not a destination) and demonstrated experience in cross-cutting health/wellness initiatives; aligned with Pioneering Healthier Communities transformation grants; challenges the conventional wisdom that speed and quality are opposing forces.  “The best approach is to start small and test out new approaches in laboratories where confounding complexities can be limited, and investment and outcomes can be easily tracked.”  Investment and ACCOUNTABILITY is a must.  The challenge is sustainability.


HICCup is about accelerating the action: The five-year goal for HICCup: “Early promising results,” results that can be used to inspire other communities in America and give people the confidence to demand better.
Dyson: ”The best thing I can do for the digital health ecosystem now is to prove, through these pilots and HICCup, that entrepreneurs can make a real impact.”



Bill Burgess

**************************
NWCTEDC Minutes - Steering/BOD
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
@ NW CT Chamber of Commerce
Attendance: Jocelyn Ayer, Bill Burgess, Frank Chiaramonte, Fran Delaney, Brad Hoar, Brian Mattiello, Rich Meinert, Ted Murphy, Doug Parker, JoAnn Ryan, Sharon Waagner, Amy Wynn, Steve Zarrella, John Kania, Lori Hart, Christine Bianchi, Kris Durante, Jan Lyon, Donna Labbe, Cindy Guerreri, Elinor Carbone, Erin Wilson, Stephanie Barksdale, Paul Rougeot, Guy Rovezzi, Robert Rubbo, Greg Brisco, Leslie Polito, Dan Sherr, Carla Angevine, Maria Skinner, Kay Carroll

I. Presentation on Collective Impact
Bill Burgess introduced the guests:

John Kania, FSG managing director
"FSG is a nonprofit consulting firm specializing in strategy, evaluation, and research. We were founded in 2000 as Foundation Strategy Group and have completed more than 600 consulting engagements with many of the world's leading corporations, nonprofit organizations, and charitable foundations."
Lori Hart, Executive Director & Christine Bianchi, Chairman - Waterbury's Bridge to Success Program
"Waterbury Bridge to Success (BTS) is a partnership of local organizations, families and volunteers.  By joining forces, we ensure the city's youth, from cradle to career, have access to the quality healthcare, education and support they need to become responsible adults.  Together, we are building a strong bridge to connect our youth to a brighter future."
Dan Sherr, Executive Director of Valassis College for Advance Media Planning
Extensive experience in data analytics, providing advice and counsel to Waterbury's Bridge to Success community-based youth initiative

Why is using a collective impact process important? (John)
- Allows organizations to work more effectively together
- Frames opportunities using innovation
- Promotes positive behavioral change
- Better use of limited resources
- Cross sector alignment encourages coordinated action and sharing of lessons learned
- Emphasizes urgency, enthusiasm and realism
- Collective Impact Barriers:
- Lack of initiative
- Super counter cultural
- Tend toward isolated impact
- Alignment between organizations
- Understanding the nature of the problem:
- Is it a simple problem (baking a cake)
- A complicated problem (sending a rocket to the moon)
- Or a complex problem (raising a child - unpredictable)

What are the key components of the process? (John)
- Five elements of Collective Impact:
- Common agenda (clear goals & strategies)
- Shared measurement (track over time)
- Mutually reinforcing activities (coordination)
- Continuous communication (cross sectors)
- Backbone organization (with working groups)
- Applications: education (cradle to profession), health care (obesity), social agencies, youth development, economic development, workforce development (public housing, residents to jobs), youth substance abuse prevention
- Uses adaptive problem solving techniques vs. technical problem solving techniques
- There are no silver bullets, more like silver buckshot - impacts in multiple ways
- Must be flexible and organic - Look at sub-measures

How did your organization use the collective impact process? (Lori & Christine)
- Waterbury Bridge to Success Program is a public-private partnership bringing together 75 organizations in the Waterbury area.
- Common agenda/goal: "Waterbury youth will succeed in school, work and life"
- Shared measurements: kindergarten readiness, 3rd grade reading scores, 8th grade math scores, high school graduation rates, post-secondary graduation rates
- Mutually reinforcing activities: promote physical activities, health, early literacy, nutrition, career awareness, caregiver skills
- Continuous communication is key to success
- Actions: Created School Readiness Council, helped develop Prevention Policy guidelines for the BOE, provide community feedback, help to merge new initiatives with existing policies
- Focal points: community council, family engagement, child & health development, early care & education, positive youth development, workforce development

What process existed before? (Lori & Christine)
- Fragmentation with each organization doing their own thing

What lessons did you learn from your experiences? (Lori & Christine)
- Keep focus on data & performance measures
- Create a data inventory, review & analysis are critical
- Involve parents and community members
- Focus on community identified issues
- Small investment in backbone organization significantly influences benefits
- What makes Collective Impact different?:
- Engages all sectors
- Structured
- Flexible and organic
- Data driven
- Solutions emerge

What suggestions do you have for starting/initiating the collective impact process?
(John, Lori & Christine)
- Create a steering committee to determine purpose.
- Create a list of potential organizations for the network.
- Outline potential working groups.
- Establish community-wide messages based on healthy living, early literacy and reducing absenteeism
- Look for opportunities (gaps) that cross multiple organizations
- Submit grant requests collaboratively
- Manage data collaboratively
- Backbone Tasks:
- Guide vision
- Support aligned activities
- Established shared measures
- Data Information (Dan):
- Develop measures
- More data is better
- Data to be analyzed

How do you select the organizations/participants in the collective impact process?
(John, Lori & Christine)
- Begin with steering committee
- Be flexible, add organizations when opportunities develop
- Waterbury Partnership Funding:
- Funding for the backbone organization (foundations, city, corporations)
- Get funders at the table

Is commonality of purpose a key component of collective impact? (Group Discussion)
- Yes, driven by need for complex social changes

Can collective impact center on multiple areas simultaneously? (Group Discussion)
- Yes, but it can become more difficult to manage.

Can this be helpful to us, and if so in what way? (Group Discussion)
- Meeting attendees expressed strong interest

What would be our logical next steps? (Group Discussion)
- Doug suggested Fit Together Steering Committee discuss as the NWCTEDC Task Team most closely aligned with intended outcomes.

Who is willing to do what and by when? (Group Discussion)
- Fit Together Steering Committee will meet and discuss next steps.  

****************************
NWCTEDC Minutes - Board of Directors
Tuesday, January 14, 2014
@ NW CT Chamber of Commerce
Attendance: Bill Baxter, David Dean, Lou Helt, Doug Parker, Tim Abbott, Jocelyn Ayer, Bill Burgess, Frank Chiaramonte, Susan Clayton, Fiona deMerell, Celeste Echlin, Lou Helt, Brad Hoar, Leona LeJeune, Dale Martin, Dick Labich, Rich Meinert, Brian Mattiello, Patricia Mechare, John Morici, Ted Murphy, JoAnn Ryan, Stephen Silver, Dwain Snow, Don Stein, Sharon Waagner, Greg Brisco, Jan Lyon, Elinor Carbone, Bob Rubbo, Sherri Dadomo

IV. Collective Impact Presentation
Bill Burgess gave a power point presentation and hand-outs on Collective Impact: what it is, who benefits and how cities who have implemented this have benefitted.  Lengthy discussion followed and further talks will resume at 2/19 Executive Committee meeting.

Notes:
- The website for more information about Collective Impact is www.fsg.org
- Collective Impact uses a framework based on common visions for improving communities - "diverse organizations coming together to solve complex social problems"
- Collective Impact is a process for working with cascading levels of collaboration with multiple organizations sharing a common vision for community improvement.
- Collective Impact is evidence based using data and analytics to define paths forward and a creating a framework for action for continuous improvement in creating vibrant communities.
- Collective Impact is "community based problem solving."

Comments from Board members:
- Adequate staffing will be needed, anticipate 1.5 staff positions to collect and analyze data, seek and manage funding sources for implementation
- This is already happening with land trusts throughout NW CT
- UConn-Torrington could be a potential host/sponsor for this initiative
- Unites organizations with shared interests, encourages collaboration, important to stay focused
- Data focused, seeks agreement through common interests of multiple organizations
- Could increase community participation through events
- Who serves as the host organization? - NW CT Chamber, United Way NW CT, NW CT EDC, NW Hills Council of Governments?
- Requires political will, adequate staffing and funding

**************************
NWCTEDC Minutes -Board of Directors
Tuesday, November 19, 2013
@ NW CT Chamber of Commerce
Attendance: Susan Clayton, Patricia Mechare, Doug Parker, Lauren Smith, Sharon Waagner, Fran Delaney, Anthea Disney, William Baxter, David Dean, Ted Murphy, JoAnn Ryan, Rich Minert, Joann Brogis, Jocelyn Ayer, Frank Chiaramonte, Leona LeJeune, John Maxwell, Richard Labich, Bill Burgess, Lew Chappel, Fiona de Merell, Lou Helt, Rick Lynn, Stephen Silver, Larry Sweeney, Susan Dichter, Rob Michalik

II. Task Team Reports
D.     Healthcare/ Fit Together- Bill Burgess
- Fit Together is a health and wellness initiative with a Torrington/Winsted focus, funded through the YMCA and Wal-Mart.  They recently received their 2nd round of funding.
- 1st part of the problem is unhealthy weight, using better language to describe it, the walking revolution (can be found on EDC website), and how to work together collectively.
-  2nd part is the Early Childhood Initiative- growing healthy children- working with Torrington Early Childhood Collaborative.
- For more information on the Collective Impact Initiative, Communities That Care Coalition, visit fsg.org.

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NWCTEDC Minutes -Executive Committee
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
@ NW CT Chamber of Commerce
Attendance: JoAnn Ryan, Lauren Smith, Bill Baxter, Lew Chappel, Rose Ponte, Leo Paul, Doug Parker, Lou Helt, Domenic Carazza, Rick Lynn, Rich Minert, David Dean, Jocelyn Ayer

II. Task Team Reports
D.  Healthcare/Fit Together
1.     JoAnn Ryan gave the update on the Fit Together Committee.
2.     The committee is working on a booklet for companies on how to make employees healthier and happier.
3.     The Fit Together group meets monthly and is working on policy change to make people realize the importance of health and fitness.
4.     The group has also had discussions on the area bike routes and the Rails to Trails initiative

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